RCPCH State of Child Health short report: Sustainability & Transformation Partnerships

STP report 2017.PNG

Launched on 16 May 2017, the RCPCH Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP) report is based on a review of the 44 published STP plans, which reveal major deficiencies – they are failing to take into account the needs of infants, children and young people. STPs are the proposals put together by the NHS and local councils to meet the health needs of the local population in 44 areas of England.

Link to report here

Early administration of inhaled corticosteroids for preventing chronic lung disease in very low birth weight preterm neonates

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Image: Pixabay

Chronic lung disease (CLD) remains a common complication among preterm infants. There is increasing evidence that inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLD. Due to their strong anti-inflammatory properties, corticosteroids are an attractive intervention strategy. However, there are growing concerns regarding short- and long-term effects of systemic corticosteroids. Theoretically, administration of inhaled corticosteroids may allow for beneficial effects on the pulmonary system with a lower risk of undesirable systemic side effects.

Link to review here

RCPCH Report: Poverty is ‘making children sick’

Poverty and child health RCPCH 2017

Poverty and low income is seriously affecting the health of UK children according to paediatricians – and any new Government must tackle health inequalities or risk storing up health problems for future generations. That’s according to a new report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) launched today (11 May 2017).

The report looks at a number of areas including food insecurity, poor housing and worry, stress and stigma – and their effect on the health of children.

It reveals that:

  • more than two-thirds of paediatricians surveyed said poverty and low income contribute ‘very much’ to the ill health of children they work with
  • housing problems or homelessness were a concern for two thirds of respondents.
  • more than 60% said food insecurity contributed to the ill health amongst children they treat 3
  • 40% had difficulty discharging a child in the last 6 months because of concerns about housing or food insecurity
  • more than 50% of respondents said that financial stress and worry contribute ‘very much’ to the ill health of children they work with

    Link to report here

Report: Children and young people’s mental health —the role of education

Children mental health report may 2017

The House of Commons Education and Health Committees have jointly published Children and young people’s mental health: the role of education. The Committees found that financial pressures are restricting the provision of mental health services in schools and colleges.  It calls on the Government to commit sufficient resource to ensure effective services are established in all parts of the country.  It also calls for strong partnerships between the education sector and mental health services.

Cochrane Review: Interventions to improve adherence to inhaled steroids for asthma

child asthma
Image: flickr.com

Despite its proven efficacy in improving symptoms and reducing exacerbations, many patients with asthma are not fully adherent to their steroid inhaler. Suboptimal adherence leads to poorer clinical outcomes and increased health service utilisation, and has been identified as a contributing factor to a third of asthma deaths in the UK. Reasons for non-adherence vary, and a variety of interventions have been proposed to help people improve treatment adherence.

The studies we found suggest that various strategies can help people with asthma take their inhaler better, compared with “control” (e.g. usual asthma care). However, many of these studies were quite different from one another, and we are not certain about whether people will find that their asthma is improved as a result of this approach.

Link to full review here

Cochrane Review: Dietary interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood

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image: Pixabay

This is an update of the original Cochrane review, last published in 2009 (Huertas-Ceballos 2009). Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), including children with irritable bowel syndrome, is a common problem affecting between 4% and 25% of school-aged children. For the majority of such children, no organic cause for their pain can be found on physical examination or investigation. Many dietary inventions have been suggested to improve the symptoms of RAP. These may involve either excluding ingredients from the diet or adding supplements such as fibre or probiotics.

Link to review

DfE report:

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This report summarises and presents the findings from a range of activities undertaken by the Department for Education to develop our understanding and find out more about people’s knowledge and experience of peer support for children and young people’s mental health. This included support available within schools, in community settings and online. We wanted to better understand what best practice looks like, what training or accreditation it might include and how peer support fits within the range of mental health support available.

Link to Summary report

Link to full report