Pharmacological interventions for recurrent abdominal pain in childhood – Cochrane review

boy-694763_1280
Image: Pixabay.com

Abstract

Background

Between 4% and 25% of school-aged children at some stage complain of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) of sufficient severity to interfere with their daily lives. When no clear organic cause is found, the children are managed with reassurance and simple measures; a large range of pharmacological interventions have been recommended for use in these children.

Authors’ conclusions

There is currently no convincing evidence to support the use of drugs to treat RAP in children. Well-conducted clinical trials are needed to evaluate any possible benefits and risks of pharmacological interventions. In practice, if a clinician chooses to use a drug as a ‘therapeutic trial’, they and the patient need to be aware that RAP is a fluctuating condition and any ‘response’ may reflect the natural history of the condition or a placebo effect, rather than drug efficacy.

Link to full review here

Advertisements

Gene Therapy in Patients with Transfusion-Dependent β-Thalassemia – NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Donor availability and transplantation-related risks limit the broad use of allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation in patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia. After previously establishing that lentiviral transfer of a marked β-globin (βA-T87Q) gene could substitute for long-term red-cell transfusions in a patient with β-thalassemia, we wanted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of such gene therapy in patients with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia.

METHODS

In two phase 1–2 studies, we obtained mobilized autologous CD34+ cells from 22 patients (12 to 35 years of age) with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia and transduced the cells ex vivo with LentiGlobin BB305 vector, which encodes adult hemoglobin (HbA) with a T87Q amino acid substitution (HbAT87Q). The cells were then reinfused after the patients had undergone myeloablative busulfan conditioning. We subsequently monitored adverse events, vector integration, and levels of replication-competent lentivirus. Efficacy assessments included levels of total hemoglobin and HbAT87Q, transfusion requirements, and average vector copy number.

RESULTS

At a median of 26 months (range, 15 to 42) after infusion of the gene-modified cells, all but 1 of the 13 patients who had a non–β0/β0 genotype had stopped receiving red-cell transfusions; the levels of HbAT87Q ranged from 3.4 to 10.0 g per deciliter, and the levels of total hemoglobin ranged from 8.2 to 13.7 g per deciliter. Correction of biologic markers of dyserythropoiesis was achieved in evaluated patients with hemoglobin levels near normal ranges. In 9 patients with a β0/β0 genotype or two copies of the IVS1-110 mutation, the median annualized transfusion volume was decreased by 73%, and red-cell transfusions were discontinued in 3 patients. Treatment-related adverse events were typical of those associated with autologous stem-cell transplantation. No clonal dominance related to vector integration was observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Gene therapy with autologous CD34+ cells transduced with the BB305 vector reduced or eliminated the need for long-term red-cell transfusions in 22 patients with severe β-thalassemia without serious adverse events related to the drug product. (Funded by Bluebird Bio and others; HGB-204 and HGB-205 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01745120 and NCT02151526.)

Link to article here

Effect of childhood BMI on asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies – BMC Pediatrics

Abstract

Background

Asthma is a multifactorial syndrome that threatens the health of children. Body mass index (BMI) might be one of the potential factors but the evidence is controversial. The aim of this study is to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to investigate the association between asthma and BMI.

Methods

Electronic databases including, Web of Science, Pubmed, Scopus, Science Direct, ProQuest, up to April 2017, were searched by two researchers independently. The keywords “asthma, body mass index, obesity, overweight, childhood and adolescence” were used. Random and fixed effects models were applied to obtain the overall odds ratios (ORs) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Heterogeneity between the studies was examined using I2 and Cochrane Q statistics.

Results

After reviewing 2511 articles, 16 studies were eligible for meta-analysis according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. A meta-analysis from 11 case-control studies revealed OR of asthma and overweight as OR = 1.64; (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.13–2.38) and from 14 case-control studies, OR for asthma and obesity was OR = 1.92 (95% CI: 1.39–2.65), which indicated that risk of asthma in overweight and obese children and adolescence was significantly higher (1.64 and 1.92 times) than that of individuals with (p-value < 0.01 for underweight/normal weight in both cases). Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between asthma and BMI > 85 percentile according to SMD SMD = 0.21; (95%CI: 0.03–0.38; p-value = 0.021).

Conclusions

The results showed a significant relationship between BMI (obesity/overweight) and asthma among children and adolescents. It is important to study the confounding factors that affect the relationship between asthma and BMI in future epidemiological researches.

Link to article here

Macrolides in Children With Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Panacea or Placebo? Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

placebo
Image: Google Images, copyright free

Abstract

Pneumonia, most often caused by a respiratory virus, is common in childhood. Mycoplasma pneumoniae also is detected frequently, particularly in older children in the era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Despite recommendations for β-lactam antibiotics, macrolide antibiotics, including erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin, are prescribed frequently to children with acute lower respiratory infection. However, the significance of detecting “atypical” pathogens, including M pneumoniae, in children remains contentious. Considering the potential for antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of macrolides, our understanding of the role of these drugs in acute and chronic infections and in inflammatory conditions is changing. Some observational data have revealed improved outcomes in adults and children with pneumonia who are prescribed macrolides, although its widespread use has led to increases in macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and M pneumoniae. Clinical trials to define the role of macrolides in pediatric acute respiratory infection must be prioritized.

Link to article here

A Time to Save – Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

Group B Streptococcus (GBS), characterized by Lancefield in 1933, was not recognized as a human pathogen until the early 1970s when it emerged and replaced Escherichia coli as the most common cause of sepsis and meningitis among neonates and young infants. This article briefly gives a personnel account of the discovery of clinical syndromes of GBS distinguished by age at onset, vertical mode of transmission for early-onset disease, meningeal tropism for GBS capsular (CPS) type III strains, and protective CPS epitopes. It also reviews the difficult evolution of the now routine program for antenatal GBS culture screening and intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis, development of the first GBS candidate vaccines, clinical trials documenting the immunogenicity and safety of CPS tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccines, ongoing need to prevent morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, and critical need for commercial vaccines for routine use in pregnant women.

Link to article here

NSCB Safeguarding Children Survey 2018

 

child-1439468_1920
Image: Pixabay.com

 

During April and May this year the Nottinghamshire Safeguarding Children Board (NSCB) is undertaking an online survey with those who work with children and families. We would like to seek your views about safeguarding children; the support that you receive to carry out your role and how well equipped you feel to deal with the sometimes complex and challenging area of work.

As we develop new safeguarding arrangements over the next year (in response to Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018) the results from the survey will provide a particularly important perspective which will help guide how safeguarding children work is coordinated and supported in the future.

The survey should take no more than 15 minutes to complete and your contribution will help us to better respond to the needs of those who work with children and families and therefore help to improve the outcomes for children and young people in Nottinghamshire.

The survey will be open until 31 May.

A summary of the outcome from the survey will be published on the NSCB website and included within the NSCB Annual Report 2017/18.

Risk of seizures after immunization in children with epilepsy: a risk interval analysis – BMC Paediatrics

Abstract

Background

In children with epilepsy, fever and infection can trigger seizures. Immunization can also induce inflammation and fever, which could theoretically trigger a seizure. The risk of seizure after immunization in children with pre-existing epilepsy is not known. The study objective was to determine the risk of medically attended seizure after immunization in children with epilepsy < 7 years of age.

Methods

We conducted a retrospective study of children < 7 years of age with epilepsy in Nova Scotia, Canada from 2010 to 2014. Hospitalizations, emergency visits, unscheduled clinic visits, and telephone calls for seizures were extracted from medical records. Immunization records were obtained from family physicians and Public Health with informed consent. We conducted a risk interval analysis to estimate the relative risk (RR) of seizure during risk periods 0–14, 0–2, and 5–14 days post-immunization versus a control period 21–83 days post-immunization.

Results

There were 302 children with epilepsy who were eligible for the study. Immunization records were retrieved on 147 patients (49%), of whom 80 (54%) had one or more immunizations between the epilepsy diagnosis date and age 7 years. These 80 children had 161 immunization visits and 197 medically attended seizures. Children with immunizations had more seizures than either those with no immunizations or those with no records (mean 2.5 versus 0.7 versus 0.9, p < 0.001). The risk of medically attended seizure was not increased 0–14 days after any vaccine (RR = 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5–2.8) or 0–2 days after inactivated vaccines (RR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.1–7.1) versus 21–83 days post-immunization. No seizure events occurred 5–14 days after live vaccines.

Conclusions

Children with epilepsy do not appear to be at increased risk of medically attended seizure following immunization. These findings suggest that immunization is safe in children with epilepsy, with benefits outweighing risks.

Link to article here