NIHR Signal: Intensive lifestyle interventions can help obese young people lose weight

 

March Madness comes to a close
Image: health.mil

 

Obese children and adolescents can lose up to seven pounds over six to 12 months when they engage in at least 52 hours of behaviour-based lifestyle interventions. Minimal benefit was seen with shorter contact time, with less than 25 hours ineffective. The control group gained weight.

Rising obesity in the young is a global concern, which may lead to high rates of obesity-related diseases in adulthood. This review identified trials covering various weight management strategies. Lifestyle-based-interventions with sufficient contact time – as recommended by UK guidelines – showed clear benefits with no evidence of harms.

Investing in effective strategies to manage child obesity will ultimately save healthcare costs. Behaviour-based support should now be assessed for long-term weight loss and maintenance.

The evidence is still lacking whether universal child screening for obesity should be performed in the UK.

Link to review here

Advertisements

NHS England: Developing support and services for children and young people with a learning disability, autism or both

Support services for special needs

This document provides guidance for Transforming Care Partnerships (and their local partners Clinical Commissioning Groups / Local Authorities) in commissioning support and services for children and young people with learning disability, autism or both.

Link to document here

Test children’s urine before prescribing antibiotics for UTIs, says NICE

NICE logo

NICE has updated its guidance for diagnosing and managing UTIs in children.

The new recommendations give clear advice to GPs and healthcare professionals about how they can accurately test children’s urine for an infection.

This will help to give them a better indication of whether the child needs antibiotics or not. Therefore assisting in the fight against antibiotic resistance, which can be caused by the misuse of medicine.

A dipstick test offers a quick and painless way to check a child’s urine for signs that their body is fighting an infection.

NICE says children between the age of three months and three years should not be given antibiotics if their dipstick test is negative.

Children over the age of three years may need to be given antibiotics if their urine dipstick analysis shows mixed results and they have other obvious symptoms of a UTI (for example painful urination).

Children under three months of age who are suspected of having a UTI should not have a dipstick test. They should be referred to paediatric specialist care and their urine sent for urgent laboratory analysis.

EPI report: ACCESS AND WAITING TIMES IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE’S MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

Mental health services

new report by the Education Policy Institute (EPI) examines new data on access to specialist treatment for children and young people with mental health problems, and the waiting times they face. This new data was obtained by EPI through a Freedom of Information request.

Full report here